Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder


Background


Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an important impairment to consider in the Social Security disability program, but not always easily identified. Consequently, we are preparing guidance to assist reviewers. We believe you and other members of our stakeholder community, such as individuals with PTSD, their advocates, private industry and state representatives, federal partners, health care providers, members of the academic and research community, and others, have insight that could help to inform our efforts.


We are specifically requesting input in the following areas, but welcome all insight. We want to hear from you!


1. How should we consider evidence about a claimant’s behavior and functioning from non-professional sources, such as parents or friends?

2. What lesser-known symptoms of PTSD might be helpful for adjudicators to know about, and what professional sources support this information?

3. What indicators can be used to rule out PTSD as an impairment, and what professional sources support this information?


This initiative coincides with our release of a final rule, Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders, which became effective January 17, 2017. The revised criteria now include new listings for trauma- and stressor-related disorders for both adults (listing 12.15) and children age 3 to attainment of age 18 (listing 112.15). You can review the final rule HERE.


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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

My Responses To The PTSD Inqueries

YOU: 1. How should we consider evidence about a claimant’s behavior and functioning from non-professional sources, such as parents or friends? ME: Now at days all smart phones come with video recorders, as such videoed evidence can be really strong proof. A second way is to require Hospital admission/discharge papers indicating the number of times a client has had to have been hospitalized for the same condition/symptoms. ...more »

Submitted by (@scapetillo)

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Paralegal/Elder and Disability Advocate

PTSD is a common problem for the military. Therapists and social workers connected with the military are valuable in discussing this topic with the office of disability. I have personally been trained by PTSD physicians connected with the military and they may be an excellent source for you to discuss these topics. (Dover Air Force Base, Dover, DE)

Submitted by (@eondra)

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Alpha STIM

After speaking to several Enrollees suffering from PTSD and a few PTSD Counselors a treatment option that seems to help a lot is the use of Alpha STIM. The problem is that all of the service members have been told TRICARE will not pay for it which is ridiculous.

Submitted by (@matthew.a.hamm.mil)

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Linda Landry

Dear Social Security Administration: Thank you for this opportunity to comment on evaluations of trauma related disorders. I agree with the comments submitted by Kevin Liebkemann, Legal Services of New Jersey, Emilia Sicilia, Urban Justice, and Jen Burdick, Community Legal Services. I will not repeat their comments. I want to stress that the failure of decision-makers to consider whether a person with a trauma related ...more »

Submitted by (@llandry)

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Noncompliance with Treatment

Individuals who have suffered traumatic experiences often find it difficult to comply with talk therapy treatment. The regulations should do more to address the unfortunate circumstance where BECAUSE OF a mental health impairment, Claimant has difficulty proving the impairment because treatment records are sparse. In this sense, reporting and opinions from non-medical sources should be afforded more weight,

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Non Professional Input

I believe that input from non professional sources, such as parents or friends, should be included in adjudicating PTSD claims. Patients with PTSD are often more likely to display symptoms and speak more openly with family members or friends than with clinicians. Clinician input is valuable and vital and should still be the primary source of information regarding the claimant's status, however, using anecdotal information ...more »

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Evaluation of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

PTSD inquiry

I think its important to know that PTSD does not come with a medication to treat it. Nonetheless, front line professionals that work in mental health clinics still try to find medication and continue to misdiagnose disorders like bipolar disorder or borderline personality disorder when the trauma and effects of trauma are the real problem. Moreover, dissociative disorders often com with PTSD, particularly with early ...more »

Submitted by (@mpacella)

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